Are you planning a trip to Morocco and looking for some more tips and inspiration before you leave?

In this traveler spotlight, we interview Spanish Human Rights student, Andrea Denegro, to find out about her recent experiences in Morocco and share her tips and insights.

Here’s how it went…

Traveler Spotlight: Quick Morocco Travel Tips and Insights To Read Before Going

In this traveler spotlight, we interview Spanish born Andrea Denegro who shares some quick Morocco travel tips and insights from her recent trip. Click through to read now...Andrea Denegro | Quick Morocco Travel TipsTo start, could you please give us a short introduction about yourself, where you’re from and what you do?

Hello, my name is Andrea, I’m from Spain and I study a PhD in Human Rights.

When did you first visit Morocco and where did you go?

My first visit was during July and August in 2013. I traveled to Errachidia to work as a volunteer in a school.

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Errachidia Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Errachidia, Morocco | Photo by jbdodane via Flickr

What was it that made you fall in love with Morocco and did it inspire you to return?

I really loved the peace and calm of the city I stayed in.

The kids were really happy there and everyone was generous with us, they gave us sweets and water and everything we needed.

Medina, Marakech, Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Medina, Marakech, Morocco

Which Moroccan cities are your favourite and why? Would you recommend these as travel destinations? If so, where do you recommend staying?

I really recommend volunteering in Errachidia and also visiting Essaouira, the whole city, not only the touristic area.

And please, eat here! It’s so cheap and they have amazingly fresh fish.

Essaouira, Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Essaouira, Morocco

Your absolute top things to do in Morocco?

Number one, stay overnight in the Sahara desert in a town called Merzouga. This was the most amazing experience in my life.

Merzouga, Sahara Desert, Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Merzouga, Sahara Desert, Morocco

Then simply travel around the country… Visit Chefchaouen, the Dades area and Casablanca and its amazing Hassan Ii Mosque.

Chefchaouen, Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Chefchaouen, Morocco | Photo by jbdodane via Flickr
Défilé du Dadès, Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Défilé du Dadès, Morocco | Photo by jbdodane via Flickr
Hassan Ii Mosque, Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Hassan Ii Mosque, Morocco

What challenges have you faced in Morocco and how did you overcome them? Should people planning to visit Morocco be aware of these challenges?

The most challenging experience for me was in Jemaa El Fna, Marrakech, where the woman do henna on tourists.

It’s important to arrange the price before and make sure everything is clear before paying them. They can be a bit difficult to deal with.

Jemaa El Fna, Marrakech | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Jemaa El Fna, Marrakech | Photo by Britrob via Flickr

In your opinion, what is the best way to travel in Morocco and why?

For me, the best way to travel here is to involve yourself in the local communities, eat at simple places and taste the real Morocco.

Forget about organised tours and just let things happen.

Leather Tannery in Fez, Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Leather Tannery in Fez, Morocco | Photo by 16:9clue via Flickr

Based on this, what is the approximate cost of traveling in Morocco (accommodation, food, transport, entertainment)?

If you don’t want to spend a lot of money, traveling in Morocco can be done on a low budget.

A good hostel or riad in Marrakech may cost around 10 euros per night, breakfast included, which I think is a decent price. Riads are usually well located as well.

Riad in Fez, Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Riad in Fez, Morocco | Photo by Duncan Smith via Flickr

Taxis are also cheap but negotiate the price with the driver before getting in.

Can you share with us three important Morocco travel tips to know before visiting?

  • Drink your own bottled water
  • Eat as much msemmen as you can
  • Morocco is poverty stricken, so be kind and share what you have
Guelmim-Es Semara, Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Guelmim-Es Semara, Morocco | Photo by mhobl via Flickr

And finally, do you have any last words to inspire everyone reading this to travel to Morocco?

Everyone should try this experience at least once. But if you try once, I’m sure you will make it twice.

Sunset in Essaouira, Morocco | Quick Morocco Travel Tips
Sunset in Essaouira, Morocco

Andrea, thank you for sharing your quick Morocco travel tips & insights!

To learn about Andrea’s next adventures around the world, remember to follow her on Instagram: @andreadenegro.


Morocco Travel Resources

Morocco Accommodation:

To start looking at your accommodation options in Morocco, choose Hostelworld for budget, Booking.com for comfort or Airbnb for local (and get $25 off).

Morocco Flights:

If you are traveling to Morocco, it is beneficial to use a flight compare site to find the cheapest flights. We recommend and use Cheapflights.com.

Click here to compare and book cheap flights to Morocco


Now it’s over to you reading this! Leave your answers in the comments section below…

  • Are you planning a trip and looking for more Morocco travel tips? Leave your questions below and we’ll help you out!
  • Have you already been and know some more Morocco travel tips to add to the list? Let us know!

Are you interested in being a featured traveler and sharing your travel tips?

  • Click here to send an email to us
  • Share a few words about yourself and your travel experience as well as a link to your blog or favourite social media channel
  • We’ll be in contact!

 

 

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Hannah is an Australian nomad and the Founding Editor of StoryV Travel & Lifestyle. After finishing her studies in Business Administration Hannah took off to Thailand with her father for a life-changing volunteer experience that shaped the way her future panned out. The day she returned home she took up 3 jobs and booked her next ticket out. 3 months later she had quit the rat race completely and was off to Thailand once more - this time, on her own. Little did she know, that solo adventure would lead her to meet the love of her life and go on to explore the rest of the world as a digital nomad. With a thirst for experiencing unfamiliar cultures in exotic destinations around the world, Hannah most enjoys chasing sunsets, lazing on tropical beaches and getting lost among a myriad of crooked buildings and small alleyways. Follow her adventures on Twitter and Facebook!